Posts Tagged ‘Chief Keef’

::cues up Kanye’s “FEELS GOOD TO BE HOME!” outro from “Touch the Sky”::

Greetings, all. Did you miss us?

Earlier this week, I came across Bauce Sauce’s “0 to 100” freestyle, the aptly titled “0 to 140.” If you’re not familiar with Bauce Sauce, he’s a writer who’s made some pretty big waves these past couple of years. Using his irreverent humor and his website, Mostly Junk Food, Mr. Sauce has worked his way to a pretty sweet gig at Complex. So, what better way to announce to the rest of the world that you’re here than to let them hear you spit hot fire…or something. While Sauce has been rapping for a while, apparently, this track is what’s got him dealing with the masses en masse.

BAUCE

The song “0 to 140,” sarcastically, was called the hip-hop killer, possibly because Bauce Sauce is a kind of nerdy-looking white guy going ham over a Drake song about how his blogging contemporaries just can’t see him. Kind of like John Cena, but replace wigga-like mannerisms and a can-conquer-anything attitude with self-depreciating humor. And that’s all it took for some of the hip-hop world to turn on this guy quicker than, well, the WWE “Universe” has turned on John Cena (unless, of course, you “get” it–but even still). Which brings me to my point: in hip-hop, sarcasm and parody tend to not translate that well.

Weird Al got into a long-standing beef with Coolio over the “Amish Paradise” song. Heck, I have been in some weird confrontations because what I said went over people’s heads. Is it because hip-hop, even with its long list of metaphors, is an art form where people still take things at relative face value? Perhaps, considering there are individuals who believe Rick Ross actually has a billion dollars. It’s also potentially that, and I really hate playing the “race card”, because Bauce is a nerdy white dude, some purists unfairly attack this (somewhat out-there) comment of “I [messed] around and ruined hip-hop.” Is it out of line? Kind of, considering that hip-hop, to some, is considered sacred (in other words, no one can make fun of it, unless you’ve been accepted in the culture. And even then, it’s still looked at sideways). But, did it warrant the guy getting threatened to be robbed for being a clown?

In the immortal words of Keith Cozart, nah. Plus, it gives me a reason to post this gif:

Until next time, guys and girls.

****

(Shameless Plug Alert)

For those who forgot, I do actually dabble in this rappin’ thang myself (woot, woot). With that said, be sure to check out Death of The King when it drops Sunday, August 17th over at SpeedontheBeat.Bandcamp.com and on iTunes and all that fun stuff.

Greetings and saliva, folks.

Hope your hangovers are recovered and your ready for some real spit (see what I did there?), because it’s time for Speed’s Wishlist for Hip-Hop in the Upcoming Frame of Time.* I used to do these annually on one of my older blogs, but that site was lost in The Great AOL Disintegration of the Mid-2000s. So, without further ado, here are some talking points that, if followed, can only bring peace and awesomeness into the world of hip-hop.

First, can we stop trying to sound like Chief Keef, Future/Rich Homie Quan and/or Migos? I mean, come on! I get that music is one of those things that goes by the philosophy of more is better and “if it worked for them, it’ll damn sure work for me because I’m better and more real than them.” But, if I’ve got to sit through one more faux-sung, over-AutoTuned track about trapping, thots/t.h.o.t. (a word/acronym that must be sent to pasture–and soon), and the lot with that “Karate Chop” flow, I swear that I’m going to start throwing chairs. And we all know what happens when people throw chairs (Ed. Note: link contains a use of “the n-word”). Now, I can’t lie. If I’m in the club, and I’ve had a couple…ummm…sips of Sprite, I don’t want to hear Immortal Technique, Nas, or Lupe. Heck, I don’t even want to hear my music when I’m partying, so everything has its place. But, get out their lane, random up-and-coming rapper 217291.

Secondly, I’d love to hear a female rapper (sorry Jean Grae, there is still a socioeconomic need to differentiate between male and female rappers–even if I don’t necessarily agree with it) to drop bars without referring to their sex or referring to themselves as female dogs (keeping it PG here). I know that people try to “reclaim” words and re-purpose them as strong, pro-cause terms, but I still can’t see much too “awesome” about being a dog. Maybe I’m missing something.

Ya...don't say, Speed?

Eh…nah. (Had to bring this one into ’14)

Third, can we stop the Drake jokes? No, this one has nothing to do with some upcoming news I’ve got for everyone the fact that I’m also writing for Boi-1da.net now. It’s more so that the jokes are repetitive and dated. It’s like watching an episode of Two and a Half Men. On repeat. For a year. You can see how that may make a person go all Robot Chicken (Ed. Note: Viewer’s discretion is advised as this video is from the show Robot Chicken). Better yet, if we’re gonna do Drake jokes, it’s like watching Degrassi: The Next Generation for a year and only getting to watch the episode where Jimmy gets shot. Yes, I watch(ed) Degrassi. In high school, and oddly in college, it got me into some…great situations. Now, some people, like Big GhostFASE and the like, they made their name off calling out some of the more…ahem…emotive rappers out there, and that’s awesome. But, that doesn’t mean everyone needs to/can do it as effectively.

This. Must. Stop.

This. Must. Stop.

Fourth, can conscious rappers get off their high horses? If there’s one thing that gets my goat more than anything, it’s that sort of you-know-what. I mean, seriously! It’s bad enough when Fake Deep Twitter talks about stuff they don’t fully comprehend. It’s even worse when you’ve gotta listen to entire albums of that gobbledygook, which brings me to my next point.

DOUBLE SEGUE!

DOUBLE SEGUE!

Fifth, can rappers get back to, oh I don’t know, rapping?! Between Joe Budden giving out relationship advice, Lupe tweeting books, Kanye “ranting” but kind of making sense, and so on, I had a headache. We get it. You’re bored and have down time like regular people, so you want to do something random. That’s cool. That’s great, actually, if it’ll keep you out of jail. But I want more music, guys and girls. Get to that, then we can talk about your extracurriculars.

Sixth, and this one is kind of local. DMV artists, let’s try to make history by having a year where we all get along and don’t start beefing over “he said, she said” tomfoolery. Because honestly, almost no one outside the DMV knows who any of us are. Heck, people have found out more about Wale through who he’s wanted to punch in the mouth at Complex than his music. Let’s not even get started on the Baltimore hip-hop scene (and yes, there is one. And no, it doesn’t just have Baltimore Club Music heads in it). If we, as an area (and don’t give me that “I’m bigger than DMV” shtick when people in the DMV the block where you stay have no idea who you are), can actually put our heads together, get off our self-imposed ego trips and actually make, oh I don’t know, music…we’d get somewhere. Beef’s are a real part of life and not everyone will love everyone else, regardless of how much easier it’d make things. But, for the love of apple pie, at least try.

*changed from “year” on request of those that are in the “it’s just a year” camp. Even though, you’ve gotta admit: focusing on just one year is a bit corny.

Ok, guess who’s bizzack, even though you can’t smell the crack on my clothes. Nor do I have to relapse on hoes. Thankfully, of course. That’d just be messy. It’s the No-Fi King back with another edition of This Week in Hip-Hop on Thee Arteest!

In the same week that Diddy says that hip-hop’s gotten too soft, Ja Rule talks about his love of prison cheesecake. No, that’s not some sort of euphemism. He really made cheesecake in prison. The game done changed, Sean. People don’t want to see gangstas or “hard” music. Hell, they barely want to see artists go at each other. People’ll say they do (see: “Control”), but when the proverbial you-know-what hits the fan, the internets go crazy for a bit and no one else really responds (or if they do, they don’t come correct). For instance, with “Control” and that TDE Cypher, they’ve got people hyped up–for now. Most artists have forgotten about “Control” as, while it said a lot, it still didn’t say much–in a long-term sort of way. Inversely, and I’m not championing the kid, but someone like a Chief Keef comes out talking about “bang-bang kill kill” and people are ready to call him the scourge of the earth. But, wait! I thought that’s what you wanted, more “realism” to counter the backpackers and such.

lupe-krit

Anyhow, before I have to take this to my own blog, looks like Lupe’s going to get some Cadillatica for his new album. Big K.R.I.T is slated to appear (in some way) on Lu’s Tetsuo and Youth. Now, long-time followers of me know that I have my reservations about Lupe, but this could very well be a dope combination–especially if K.R.I.T actually spits on the track as well as produces it. Now, some of you may ask, “Weren’t KRIT and Lu on the same song before?” No. As far as I know, and as far as The Google’s told me, they appeared on separate versions of Trae’s “I’m On,” but not on the same song (aside from some random Soundcloud remixes).

Suffering from Success, or “How I Made the Same CD Twenty Times”

DJ Khaled has released another monstrocity I mean hellacious I mean weedpl–OK, you know what? They say if you can’t say anything nice, don’t say it. DJ Khaled released another CD this week. If you liked his other work, you’ll probably still find something on this one you like–unless you’re tired of hearing the same people do the same song for the umpteenth time. If you grew tired of his mixtape-albums back before LeBron won a championship, then you should stay away. Stay far away. I know, “Speed hates Khaled but loves Jean Grae’s album. He’s such a snob.” No, I’m just a fan of good music. Khaled and his team have been doing, legitimately, the same song since I was in high school. I don’t care if the song’s talking about guns and butter, the socioeconomic decline of middle-class Black America, or watching a stripper do pole tricks. Just make it good, and I’ll give it a chance. That’s all I ask of music, is that it actually try to be good. Even if it fails, even if it sounds more no-fi than anything I’ve put out, even if it flops–just try. That’s what gets me about the Khaled album-tapes. There’s no sort of effort anymore to even try to make it good.

Well, I’m out until next time. Hopefully, this time next week I can actually be on a full episode of #TeamDARRadio.

So I’m sure we’ve all seen the 2013 BET Hip-Hop Awards Ciphers. But, I bet you haven’t seen what actor, comedian, writer and YouTube sensation Justin Hires has cooked up to parody some of pop culture’s biggest music icons of 2013 in his own version of a BET awards Hip-Hop cipher. His cipher features a faux Drake, Chief Keef, Macklemore, Miley Cyrus, and Kendrick Lamar. Although I, like you, stumbled across this while searching for the real 2013 Kendrick Lamar BET Cipher (which can be viewed Here), I was pleasantly surprised to find this hilarious parody and I felt that I just had to share it with the rest of my lovers of hip-hop and comedy. So check it out below and as usual leave a comment in the comment section to let me know what you think of the vid. (WARNING: Probably Not Safe For Watching at work…vulgar language.)

Capture